Directing Change

For Schools

This page is intended to offer a comprehensive overview of suicide prevention resources for schools. If you have any questions about the above resources or about mental health and suicide prevention on your campus or in your community, please contact Stan Collins: contact us. If you or one of your students or colleagues is in need of emotional support or in crisis, please contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1.800.273.8255.

AB 2246 Resources and Trainings

AB 2246 required all schools that serve pupils in grades 7-12 to implement suicide prevention policies (including prevention, intervention and postvention) by the start of the 2017/18 school year. The Directing Change Team can support California school districts and schools with trainings and one-on-one support with developing or improving existing policies and programs to meet the requirements of this new legislation.

Key Links:

    • CDE Model Policy:  The California Department of Education recently issued their model suicide prevention policy to assist districts in complying with AB2246.  Stan Collins from the Directing Change was part of the workgroup that helped inform the model policy and is available to offer districts and schools technical assistance.

 

    • Everything You Need to Implement AB 2246:  This guide provides a comprehensive overview of resources to assist schools and districts with implementing the requirements of AB 2246 including staff trainings, accessing data, risk assessment tools, youth engagement programs, postvention planning and general suicide prevention resources.

 

    • Suicide Prevention: A Toolkit for Schools:  This publication from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) was created to assist high schools and school districts in designing and implementing strategies to prevent suicide and promote behavioral health. It includes tools to implement a multi-faceted suicide prevention program that responds to the needs and cultures of students.

 

  • Preparing for Policy Change:  A Hands-on Workshop for Districts:  This full day workshop will familiarize attendees with the requirements for suicide prevention policies established by AB2246, and assist attendees with strategic planning for how to meet the requirements in the areas of staff training, assessment and intervention, postvention and youth engagement. During the workshop attendees will be introduced to the key principles of comprehensive school-based suicide prevention and have a chance to work together in teams to and receive one-on-one support by training facilitators.  The training is for district and school staff including administrators, Student/Pupil Support Services, Counseling and Psychological Service, Child Welfare and Attendance. Participation recommended for 3 to 4 representatives per district.  Recommended for up to 50 people.  Contact Us to request a training.

Resources for Teachers to Help Students with Films

Directing Change PowerPoint Presentation (Download here): This brief presentation is intended to be reviewed by an adult advisor on campus and then shared with students. It is not intended to take the place of a comprehensive suicide prevention or mental health program; instead it offers a brief overview of suicide prevention and mental health as well as details about the contest.

Directing Change Participation Booklet: These booklets provide an overview of the contest to assist youth and their advisors in submitting a film. Consider it a condensed version of the Directing Change website with all the important information and resources you need to create a film. E-versions as well as print ready versions are available:

 Directing Change Short Participation Booklet- Print ready version / E-version

 Directing Change Full Participation Booklet- Print ready version / E-version

Suicide Prevention 101 Prezi PresentationThis suicide prevention 101 presentation is intended to cover the basics of suicide prevention and provide background for films entered into the suicide prevention category.

Educational Videos: The educational videos are films produced by some of the Directing Change Team that discuss various mental health and suicide prevention topics. Its purpose is to provide more information to students and teachers that will help inspire the filmmaking process.

Lesson Plans

Suicide Prevention Lesson Plan Guide: “Recognizing Warning Signs and Offering Help”. This lesson plan can be used with a class or group of youth and includes optional interactive activities.

Suicide Prevention Lesson Plan PowerPoint presentation: This presentation can be used in conjunction with the above Lesson Plan Guide.

Staff Trainings and Prevention Resources

Staff Trainings (in person)

SafeTALK (Livingsworks)
Registry: SPRC, Best Practice Registry
Cost: Varies (Free-$300)
SafeTALK is a half-day training program that teaches participants to recognize and engage persons who might be having thoughts of suicide and to connect them with community resources trained in suicide intervention. SafeTALK stresses safety while challenging taboos that inhibit open talk about suicide. The ‘safe’ of safeTALK stands for ‘suicide alertness for everyone’. The ‘TALK’ letters stand for the practice actions that one does to help those with thoughts of suicide: Tell, Ask, Listen, and Keep-Safe.
Website: https://www.livingworks.net/programs/safetalk/

Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST, Livingworks)
Registry: SAMHSA National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices
Cost: Varies ($100-$200)
Applied Suicide Intervention Skills Training (ASIST) is a two-day interactive workshop in suicide first aid. ASIST teaches participants to recognize when someone may have thoughts of suicide and work with them to create a plan that will support their immediate safety.
Website: www.livingworks.net/programs/asist/

SuicideTALK (Livingworks)
Cost: Varies
This discussion based workshop (ranging from 90 minutes to a half a day), SuicideTALK invites all participants—regardless of prior training or experience—to become more aware of suicide prevention opportunities in their community. Dealing openly with the stigma around suicide, this exploration focuses upon the question “Should we talk about suicide?” By looking at this question in several different ways, session members can discover some of the beliefs and ideas about suicide in their communities—and in themselves.
Website: www.livingworks.net/programs/suicidetalk/

QPR (Question, Persuade, Refer)
Registry: SAMHSA National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices
Cost: Varies (Trainer Certification: $495)
QPR (Question, Persuade, and Refer) Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention is a 1-2 hour educational program designed to teach lay and professional “gatekeepers” the warning signs of a suicide crisis and how to respond. Trainees receive a QPR booklet and wallet card as a review and resource tool that includes local referral resources. Train the Trainer opportunities available.
Website: www.qprinstitute.com/

Mental Health First Aid
Cost: Varies
Mental Health First Aid is an 8-hour course that teaches you how to identify, understand and respond to signs of mental illnesses and substance use disorders. The training gives you the skills you need to reach out and provide initial help and support to someone who may be developing a mental health or substance use problem or experiencing a crisis.
Website: https://www.mentalhealthfirstaid.org/cs/

The Trevor Project: Trainings for Youth-Serving Professionals
Cost: Varies
The Trevor Project’s Trainings for Professionals include in-person Ally and CARE trainings designed for adults who work with youth. These Trainings help counselors, educators, administrators, school nurses, and social workers discuss LGBTQ-competent suicide prevention.
Website: www.thetrevorproject.org/pages/trainings-for-youth-serving-professionals

  • Trevor Ally Trainings
    The Trevor Ally Program help adults learn about lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youth people, the specific risks and challenges they face and how they can become an “ally” by knowing valuable resources and strategies.
  • Trevor CARE Trainings
    The Trevor CARE Trainings help adults who work with youth learn to “Connect, Accept, Respond and Empower” (CARE) young people in crisis. This training discusses LGBTQ-specific risk factors for suicide, explores protective factors that can lower these risks and how to help youth get the support they need.

If you are interested in having Trevor provide one of these trainings for your staff, please email Chris Bright for scheduling details (chris.bright@thetrevorproject.org)

Talk Saves Lives: An Introduction to Suicide Prevention
A community-based presentation that covers the general scope of suicide, the research on prevention, and what people can do to fight suicide. Attendees will learn the risk and warning signs of suicide, and how together, we can help prevent it.
Website: afsp.org/our-work/education/talk-saves-lives-introduction-suicide-prevention/

Break Free from Depression
Developed at Boston Children’s Hospital, Break Free from Depression is a school-based curriculum designed to increase adolescents’ awareness and knowledge about depression, enhance their ability to recognize signs and symptoms in themselves and their friends, and increase students’ skills and strategies for finding help for themselves and their peers. This 4-session curriculum for high school students combines didactic and interactive activities. The cornerstone of the curriculum is a documentary that focuses on a diverse group of real adolescents (not actors) talking about their struggles with depression and suicide in their own words.
Website: www.childrenshospital.org/breakfree

Eliminating Barriers to Learning
Cost: Free
Equips secondary school teachers and staff with a training and continuing education program that focuses on mental health issues in the classroom. Includes training modules, PowerPoints, an administrator’s guide, PSAs, articles, and a poster.
Website: www.store.samhsa.gov/product/Mental-Health-It-s-Part-of-Our-Classroom/SMA07-4283

Parents and Teachers As Allies (NAMI)
NAMI offers a free, on-site presentation that informs teachers and school personnel about mental health conditions, warning signs, how to communicate and partner with families effectively, how to link to community services quickly and how to create a supportive learning environment for all students. The presentation is 90 minutes and is led by a team from the community and consists of a young adult with a mental health condition, a parent and a teacher.
Website: www.nami.org/Find-Support/NAMI-Programs/NAMI-Parents-Teachers-as-Allies

Staff Trainings (online)

Question Persuade Refer (QPR) Online:
Registry: SAMHSA National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices
Cost: Varies (Individual: $30, Institutional Licenses also available)
A one-hour online gatekeeper course that covers the following components:
• How to Question, Persuade and Refer someone who may be suicidal
• How to get help for yourself or learn more about preventing suicide
• The common causes of suicidal behavior
• The warning signs of suicide
• How to get help for someone in crisis
Website: www.qprinstitute.com/individual-training

Keenan
Keenan offers a free, short web-based tutorial that includes information regarding the new AB2246 law including warning signs and protective factors.
Website: www.keenan.com/2017/suicide-prevention-in-schools/

At-Risk for High School Educators (Kognito)
A 60-minute interactive role-play simulation that builds awareness, knowledge and skills about mental health and suicide prevention, preparing high school educators to recognize students in psychological distress, discuss concerns and, if necessary, connect them with support services. Learning Objectives include: Identifying warning signs of mental distress, including verbal, behavioral and situational clues; managing conversations with students to determine the need for referral; and developing awareness of negative stereotypes and misconceptions about mental distress and illness
Website: https://kognito.com/products/at-risk-for-high-school-educators

Step In, Speak Up! (Kognito)
A 30-minute interactive role-play simulation for educators that builds understanding and appreciation for the challenges faced by LGBTQ youth, and prepares users to lead real-life conversations with students to curtail harassment and support those who may be struggling as a result of bullying or isolation.
Website: https://kognito.com/products/step-in-speak-up

Signs Matter: Online Suicide Prevention Training for K-12 Educators
Cost: $35 (Individual) / $25 (50–99) / $15 (100–199)
Signs Matter was developed based on a combination of science and best practice. The program presents scientifically based information on a variety of topics related to youth suicide, alongside best practice recommendations drawn from experts in the mental health and education fields. Science sheds light on key questions of risk and protective factors for youth suicide, as well as the most common behavioral presentations expressed by at risk youth. Recommendations for school personnel roles, support, referrals, and interventions are drawn from best practices of educational and mental health experts. Website: afsp.org/our-work/education/signs-matter-early-detection/

Intervention

Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale
The Columbia-Suicide Severity Rating Scale (C-SSRS) is a series of simple language questions that anyone can ask. This risk assessment tool helps users identify whether someone is at risk for suicide, assess the severity and immediacy of that risk, and gauge the level of support ht person need.

Users of the C-SSRS tool ask people:

  • Whether and when they have thought about suicide (ideation)
  • What actions they have taken — and when — to prepare for suicide
  • Whether and when they attempted suicide or began a suicide attempt that was either interrupted by another person or stopped of their own volition

Website: www.cssrs.columbia.edu/the-columbia-scale-c-ssrs/about-the-scale/

Assessing and Managing Suicide Risk Training
Registry: SPRC, Best Practice Registry
Cost: $115 per participant
Assessing and Managing Suicide Risk (AMSR) Training is a one-day workshop for behavioral health professionals that is based on the latest research and designed to help participants provide safe suicide care.
Website: www.sprc.org/training-events/amsr

Connect Project
Connect provides customized training and interaction with experts in the field of suicide prevention and postvention. Website: www.theconnectprogram.org

MY3
MY3 App is a free app that lets people identify their network and plan to stay safe. MY3 prepares people to help themselves and reach out to others—three (3) people they feel they could talk to when they are having thoughts of suicide.
Website: www.my3app.org

Virtual Hope Box
The Virtual Hope Box (VHB) is a smartphone application designed for use by patients and their behavioral health providers as an accesory to teatment. Tools to help patients with coping, relaxation, distraction, and postive thinking is provided on the VHB.
Website: t2health.dcoe.mil/apps/virtual-hope-box

Suicide Survivor Speakers Bureau
The Suicide Survivor Speakers Bureau consists of people who have lost a loved one to suicide and have been trained to speak safely and effectively about their loss to the public, and to use their story of loss to deliver a message of prevention. The Bureau’s goal is to prevent suicide through the telling of their members’ stories.
Website: www.namimaine.org/?page=SpeakersBureau

Recognizing & Responding to Suicide Risk: Essential Skills for Clinicians
Cost: Varies ($80 person, additional event fees may apply)
The American Association of Suicidology offers the Recognizing and Responding to Suicide Risk: Essential Skills for Clinicians (RRSR) training. The advanced, interactive training is based on established core competencies that mental health professionals need in order to effectively assess and manage suicide risk.
Website: www.suicidology.org/training-accreditation/rrsr

“Preventing Suicide: A Toolkit for High Schools” (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration)
This publication from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) was created to assist high schools and school districts in designing and implementing strategies to prevent suicide and promote behavioral health. It includes tools to implement a multi-faceted suicide prevention program that responds to the needs and cultures of students.
Website: store.samhsa.gov/product/Preventing-Suicide-A-Toolkit-for-High-Schools/SMA12-4669

Accessing Data 

California Healthy Kids Survey
The California Health Kids Survey collects data on from students in grades 5, 7,9 and 11 about attitudes, behaviors, and experiences related to school and learning. The survey was developed in 1999 and administered on a voluntary basis by schools across California. Some questions in this section include the following:
• Seriously considered attempting suicide in the past 12 months.
• Depression Related Feelings (student reported)

Aggregated state and county data is available online from 2011 to 2013. To access state and county data go to http://chks.wested.org

Reports CHKS (http://chks.wested.org/)
Step 1: Select “Reports” from top menu
Step 2: Identify County and/or District

Query CHKS (http://chks.wested.org/query-chks/)
Step 1: Choose one of the survey topics and then type of subcategory. Four subcategories are available : 1) grade level, 2)race/ethnicity, 3) gender and grade level and 4) level of connectedness to school.

Step 2: A new page will appear in table format listing all counties and respective data. To view only a specific county, choose “customize table” and select desired county. Data can also be viewed in bar, map and pie format and downloaded (see download icon). Prior year data is available through WestEd. Please contact them at 88.841.7536. Website: http://chks.wested.org/

Youth Risk Behavior Survey
The Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) monitors six types of health-risk behaviors that contribute to the leading causes of death and disability among youth and adults. Data is available from 1991 to 2015 for high schools and middle schools. Six health topics are covered in the survey including behaviors that contribute to unintentional injuries and violence. Questions in this section include:
• Felt sad or hopeless (almost every day or 2 or more weeks in a row so that they stopped doing some unusual activities during the 12 months before the survey
• Seriously considered attempting suicide (during the 12 months before the survey)
• Made a plan about how they would attempt suicide (during the 12 months before the survey)
• Attempted suicide (one or more times during the 12 months before the survey)
• Attempted suicide that resulted in an injury, poisoning, or overdose that had to be treated by a doctor or nurse (during the 12 months before the survey)

To access local data go to http://nccd.cdc.gov/youthonline/App/
Step 1: Select High School or Middle School status

Step 2: Select location and scroll down to “Local” and choose a city and press “GO” icon. Only information for five California cities is available: Oakland, Los Angeles, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Francisco.

Step 3: A new page will appear where data is displayed by all health topics surveyed. The left side bars allows for display by selected health topics and demographic criteria. Data can also be viewed in graph format (see Tab-Graph) and printed (see print icon).
Note: The YRBS data can also be downloaded for further analysis. Visit https://chronicdata.cdc.gov/health-area/youth-risk-behaviors for instructions and to download data.

Postvention

“After a Suicide: A Toolkit for Schools” (American Foundation for Suicide Prevention and the Suicide Prevention Resource Center)
This toolkit is designed to assist schools in the aftermath of a suicide (or other death) in the school community. It is meant to serve as a practical resource for schools facing real-time crises to help them determine what to do, when, and how. The toolkit reflects consensus recommendations developed in consultation with a diverse group of national experts, including school-based personnel, clinicians, researchers, and crisis response professionals. It incorporates relevant existing material and research findings as well as references, templates, and links to additional information and assistance.
Website: www.sprc.org/sites/default/files/migrate/library/AfteraSuicideToolkitforSchools.pdf

Postvention Checklist: A Guide for Schools (from SAMHSA’s Preventing Suicide A Toolkit for High Schools

Suggested for: Administrators, school mental health professionals, counselors, student support staff, nurses

A death by suicide in the school community can have a tremendous impact on your students, teachers and staff.  Have you considered what to do with the empty chair in the classroom?  How to handle memorials?  How to work with the media?  And how to provide immediate and long term emotional support to students? This training will provide an overview of best practices on “Suicide Postvention” and assist your district or school in developing a plan to respond to deaths by suicide in the school community including a review of current protocols, and assistance with creation of a “Postvention” plan to respond effectively and support students.

Length:  3 hours to full day

The Directing Chang Team is available to provide a shorter 3-hour training on “Postvention”, or a full-day workshop where attendees leave with a draft “Postvention Suicide Response Plan” for their district or school. Please contact us for more information.

Postvention: Responding to Deaths by Suicide
Suggested for: Administrators, school mental health professionals, counselors, student support staff, nurses

A death by suicide in the school community can have a tremendous impact on your students, teachers and staff.  Have you considered what to do with the empty chair in the classroom?  How to handle memorials?  How to work with the media?  And how to provide immediate and long term emotional support to students? This training will provide an overview of best practices on “Suicide Postvention” and assist your district or school in developing a plan to respond to deaths by suicide in the school community including a review of current protocols, and assistance with creation of a “Postvention” plan to respond effectively and support students.

Length:  3 hours to full day

The Directing Chang Team is available to provide a shorter 3-hour training on “Postvention”, or a full-day workshop where attendees leave with a draft “Postvention Suicide Response Plan” for their district or school. Please contact us for more information.

Youth Engagement

NAMI California (www.NAMICA.org):  A grassroots organization of families and individuals whose lives have been affected by serious mental illness. They advocate for lives of quality and respect, without discrimination and stigma, for all our constituents. They provide leadership in advocacy, legislation, policy development, education and support throughout California. There are people all over this state who care about you and want to help those experiencing symptoms of mental illness. Go to namica.org to look for an affiliate in your community.

  • Ending the Silence Program: Ending the Silence (ETS) is a mental health education and stigma reduction program designed specifically for high school and young adult audiences. ETS provides accurate information on mental illness and discusses the mental health continuum as something we all experience. The trained two person team provided education and personal testimony from a young person living well with a mental health condition. For more information, contact Kelly Boyles using the contact us link or 916-567-0163
  • Parents and Teachers as Allies is a free, one to two hour in‐service program that focuses on helping school professionals and families within the school community better understand the early warning signs of mental illnesses in children and adolescents. For more information, contact Kelly Boyles using the contact us link or 916-567-0163
  • NAMI on Campus is a peer led club for college students to raise awareness of mental health and wellness in order to empower them to take action on their college campuses. For more information, contact Kelly Boyles using the contact us link or 916-567-0163
  • NAMI on Campus High School (NCHS) is an adaptation of the college program, and is being pilot-tested in 2014 through a partnership with the California Department of Education (CDE) and the Placer County Office of Education (PCOE). NCHS is a peer led club for college students to raise awareness of mental health and wellness in order to empower them to take action on their high school campuses. For more information, contact Kelly Boyles using the contact us link or 916-567-0163

More Than Sad (American Foundation for Suicide Prevention)
Registry: SPRC, Best Practice Registry
Cost: $60
More Than Sad: Teen Depression is a high school curriculum featuring a 26-minute film and discussion guide that can be integrated during one class period. The program seeks to increase the knowledge of the warning signs of youth suicide, so that educators and youth are better prepared to identify and refer students who may be at risk.
Website: www.AFSP.org

Signs of Suicide (SOS)
Registry: SAMHSA National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices
Cost: $395 per toolkit
The toolkit includes a DVD with three real life stories of young people and families impacted by depression and suicide, and vignettes of teens being faced with signs of depression in their friends, which model the appropriate response. Toolkit available for Middle School and High School students. In addition, “The SOS Second Act” toolkit is geared for 11th and 12th grade to review symptoms of depression and suicide and discuss substance use and other risky behaviors. The “Signs of Self-Injury” toolkit educates youth about self-injury and how to support a friend.
Website: https://mentalhealthscreening.org/programs/youth

LEADS for Youth: Linking Education and Awareness of Depression and Suicide
Registry: SAMHSA National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices
Cost: $125
The LEADS curriculum, developed with input from students and teachers, is an interactive three-day curriculum used in a health class setting for high school students. Throughout the lessons, students discuss symptoms of depression, risk and protective factors for suicide and learn to identify warning signs of suicide.
Website: www.save.org

Kognito (Peer-to-Peer)
Registry: SAMHSA National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices
Cost: Varies (Individual License: $29, Institutional Licenses also available)
Kognito Friend2Friend introduces the concept of mental health, warning signs of psychological distress, and strategies for improving mental wellness through a 25-minute interactive, online learning activity. This suicide prevention tool was developed for students ages thirteen and over.
Website: www.kognitocampus.com/peer/

Reconnecting Youth
Registry: SAMHSA National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices
Cost: $1100
Reconnecting Youth is a program that helps at-risk youth achieve in school and decrease their drug use, anger, depression, and emotional distress. The semester long curriculum focuses on skills training within the context of peer group and adult support.
Website: www.reconnectingyouth.com/programs/

Walk in Our Shoes
Cost: Free
Walk in Our Shoes utilizes real stories from teens and young adults to teach youth about mental health challenges and mental wellness. The website includes lesson plans and activities. Similar to its sister campaign in English, Ponte en mis Zapatos (Walk In Our Shoes) reduces stigma associated with mental illnesses by debunking myths and educating 9-13 year olds about mental wellness.
Websites: www.walkinourshoes.org (or) www.ponteenmiszapatos.org

PAZ The Good Behavior Game
Cost: A classroom kit begins around $300
For elementary students, PAX teaches students self-regulation, self-control, and self-management in context of collaborating with others for peace, productivity, health and happiness.
Website: http://goodbehaviorgame.org/

Yellow Ribbon Suicide Prevention Program
Registry: SPRC, Best Practice Registry
Cost: Varies
Ask 4 Help! is a one-hour high school-based curriculum that provides students with knowledge that may increase help-seeking for themselves or on the behalf of others was developed by Yellow Ribbon. The Ask 4 Help! wallet card list how: to seek help, including a three-step action plan for helping others—staying with the person, listening to the person and getting help for the person.
Instructional materials include the PowerPoint presentation (provided on a CD), a teacher’s manual that includes talking points for each of the PowerPoint slides, a program overview and outline, an FAQ, a preparation worksheet, and links to additional resources.
Website: www.yellowribbon.org

Lifeguard Workshop: The Trevor Project
Cost: Free
The Lifeguard Workshop is a free online learning module with a video, curriculum and teacher resources for middle and high school classrooms.
Website: www.thetrevorproject.org/pages/lifeguard

Parent Engagement

For Higher Education

Postvention: A Guide For Response to Suicide on College Campuses : The Higher Education Mental Health Alliance (HEMHA), a partnership of organizations dedicated to providing leadership to advance college mental health, created this guide as an answer to the imperative need for strategies to help colleges and universities effectively and sensitively respond to campus deaths, should they occur.

ULifeline : An anonymous, confidential, online resource center, where college students can be comfortable searching for the information they need and want regarding mental health and suicide prevention. ULifeline features campus-specific information like counseling center locations and hours, and an anonymous mental health self-evaluator.

Halfof Us : Through online, on-air and live events, the JED Foundation and MTV raise awareness about mental health issues and connect people to the appropriate resources to get help. Half of Us features a library of videos of public service announcements, students and celebrities talking about important issues like prescription drug abuse, depression, student veterans, anxiety and eating disorders.

Love is Louder : Love is Louder was started by the JED Foundation, MTV and Brittany Snow to support anyone feeling mistreated, misunderstood or alone. It is a movement of all types of people who have come together to raise the volume around the message that love and support are louder than any internal or external voice that brings us down. Individuals, communities, schools and organizations have embraced Love is Louder as a way to address with issues like bullying, negative self-image, discrimination, loneliness and depression.

The JED Foundation (jedfoundation.org): The Jed Foundation’s mission is to promote emotional health and prevent suicide among college and university students. Listed below are some of the valuable resources available from the JED Foundation:

  • Help a Friend in Need: “Help A Friend In Need” is a community guide for Facebook and Instagram users to help college students and young adults identify potential warning signs that a friend might be in emotional distress and how to find help.
  • Transition Year: The JED Foundation and the American Psychiatric Foundation partnered on an online resource aimed at helping to ensure the smooth, safe and healthy transition of teenagers from high school to college.
  • JED and Clinton Health Matters Campus Program: The JED and Clinton Health Matters Campus Program (Campus Program) was created to help colleges and universities create healthier and safer campus environments to help prevent the two leading causes of death in young adults’ unintentional injuries, including those caused by prescription drug overdoses or alcohol poisoning, and suicide.
  • CampusMHAP: This free resource guide helps college and university professionals develop a comprehensive plan to promote the mental health of their campus communities and support students who are struggling emotionally or distressed.
  • Campus Teams Resource: The Jed Foundation and HEMHA (Higher Education Mental Health Alliance) developed a single resource to help colleges in the development and maintenance of ‘campus teams’.

Featured Programs

Kognito: The California Department of Education recently issued their model suicide prevention policy to assist districts in complying with AB2246. Kognito’s evidence-based professional learning simulations have been listed as a recommended resource to satisfy the training portion of the legislation. Simulations include:

  • The At-Risk for PK-12 Educators suite of products (for High SchoolMiddleSchool and Elementary School) is a turnkey solution to educate PK-12 educators and staff about mental health and suicide prevention which supports improved student wellness and school safety. They rapidly build the capacity of educators to lead real-life conversations that change lives.
  • Friend2Friend is a game-based simulation for adolescents that builds awareness, knowledge, and skills about mental health while reducing stigma. It prepares youth to recognize signs of distress, reach out to a friend they are concerned about, and help identify a trusted adult for support.
  • Step In, Speak Up! is an interactive role-play simulation for educators that builds understanding and appreciation for the challenges faced by LGBTQ youth, and prepares users to lead real-life conversations with students to curtail harassment and support those who may be struggling as a result of bullying or isolation.

Kognito is the only company with health simulations listed in the National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices (NREPP). View a free demo.

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If you are experiencing an emotional crisis, are thinking about suicide or are concerned about a friend call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline immediately: 1-800-273-8255This is a free 24-hour hotline.
The contest is part of Each Mind Matters: California's Mental Health Movement and statewide efforts to prevent suicide, reduce stigma and discrimination related to mental illness, and to promote the mental health and wellness of students. These initiatives are funded by counties through the Mental Health Services Act (Prop 63) and administered by the California Mental Health Services Authority (CalMHSA), an organization of county governments working to improve mental health outcomes for individuals, families and communities. The program is implemented by Your Social Marketer, Inc.
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